BOOK YOUR SCUBA DIVING AT RAJA AMPAT’S BEST KEPT SECRETS
Book Now

COVID-19 UPDATES

When travelling to Indonesia:

Current Rules & Restrictions: Indonesia is open but with the following restrictions:

 Visas:

Every visitor must have a valid visa/residence permit and must have a local sponsor to obtain the visa. (Ref: Permenkumham 26/2020)

The following types of visa/permit are accepted for entry: Official Visa; Diplomatic Visa; Visitor Visa; Temporary Stay Visa; Official Stay Permit; Diplomatic Stay Permit; Temporary Stay Permit; and Permanent Stay Permit.

Visa’s on arrival are not permitted, all visas must be obtained from country of origin.

 

COVID Protocols:

International Arrival Protocol still remains the same

Arrival from International Flight:

– Proven of Complete vaccinated ( Dose 1 and Dose 2)

– PCR test that been conducted at least 48 hrs before boarding

– Upon arrival another PCR test

– Quarantine 2Nights/3Days in Bali or Jakarta, they will conduct 2nd PCR Test on day 3 before you continue elsewhere

– Company Guarantee/Travel Letter

Domestic Flight

– All domestic travellers are required to present COVID-19 vaccination record (first dose is acceptable) and negative RT-PCR or Antigent test which obtained within 48 hours prior departure .

Countries allowed to enter direct to Bali (then do quarantine) and do not have to go through Jakarta. Countries not listed below must fly to Jakarta and proceed with quarantine there.

All Asian Countries

  • China, Hong Kong
  • Japan
  • South Korea
  • Malaysia, Singapore

Other countries

  • Bahrain
  • Hungary
  • India
  • Italy
  • Kuwait
  • Liechtenstein
  • Norway
  • French
  • United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Saudi Arabia
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • New Zealand

Diving in Raja Ampat Protocols:  Scuba-Diving-Raja-Ampat-COVID-19-Handbook-Selam_English_260920

 


Find Out More

Sun’s out, butt’s out!

Many smokers aren’t even aware that cigarette filters are made of thousands of particles of plastic. Yes, it’s true – and by simply throwing your cigarette butt on the ground, they get washed down drains and ultimately land up in our oceans.

Photo by Paweł Czerwiński on Unsplash

According to A Waste Free World on Instagram, cigarette butts are the most common find at beach cleanups, and one butt can contaminate up to 200 litres of water. The main question with most single use plastics (and yes, we’ll categorise cigarettes under this as well) – is what to do with the already million pieces we have accumulated throughout the years?

Scientists don’t even REALLY know if plastic will ever biodegrade or simply fragment into microscopic granules when being exposed to the sun. That’s why certain news sources cite a 500-year estimate while others prefer a 1,000-year lifespan. According to some plastics experts, all these figures are just another way of saying “a reeeeeally, reeeeeally long time.”

Whatch this video on how cigarette butts are turned into park benches

WhatsApp